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Kultivace ducha (duše)

Marcus Tullius Cicero (-149)
A. Nonne verendum est igitur, si es ita, ut dicis, ne philosophiam falsa gloria exornes? Quod est enim malus argumentum nihil eam prodesse Guam quosdam perfectos philosophos turpiter vivere?
M. Nullum vero id quidem argumentum nihil est: nam ut agri non omnes frugiferi sunt, qui coluntur, falsumque blud Accii:
Probae etsi in segetem sunt deteriorem datae
Fruges, tamen ipsae suapte natura enitent,
Sic animi non omnes culti fructum ferunt. Atque, ut in eodem simili verser, ut ager quamvis fertilis sine kultura fructuosus esse non potest, sic sine doctrina animus. Ita est utraque res sine altera debilis. Cultura autem animi philosophia est: haec extrakt vitia radicitus et praeparat animos ad satus accipiendos eaque mandat iis et, ut ita dicam, serit, /160/ quae adulta fructus uberrimos ferant. Agamus igitur, ut coepimus. Dic, si vis, de quo disputari velis.
(4566, Tusculan Disputations, Cicer. Opera vol. XVIII, Loeb 141, Cambridge (Ma) – London 1971, p. 158, 160 – II, V, 13.)
vznik lístku: leden 2009

Kultivace ducha (duše)

Marcus Tullius Cicero (-149)
A. I fit is as you say, have we not mason to fear that you are tricking out philosophy in borrowed plumes? What stronger proof of its uselessness can there bet than to find instances of completely trained philosophers who lead disgraceful lives?
M. That is really no proof, for not all cultivated fields are productive, and the datum of Accius is false:
Though placed in poorer soil good seed can yet
Of its own nature bear a shining crop,
and in the same way not all educated minds bear fruit. Moreover, to continue the same comparison, just as a field, however good the grand, cannot be productive without cultivation, so the soul cannot be productive without teaching. So true it is that the one without the other is ineffective. Now the cultivation of the soul is philosophy; this pulls out vices by the roots and makes souls fit for the reception of seed, and commits to the soul and, as we may say, sows in it seed of a kind to bear the richest fruit /161/ when fully grown. Let us go on then as we have begun; tell me if you will, what subject you wish to have discussed.
(4566, Tusculan Disputations, Cicer. Opera vol. XVIII, Loeb 141, transl. J. E. King, Cambridge (Ma) – London 1971, p. 159, 161 – II, V, 13.)
vznik lístku: leden 2009